source: netcheck/more/example_config.txt

Last change on this file was 2, checked in by egessiou, 4 years ago

moved explanatory txt files to more/

File size: 2.9 KB
Line 
1# Any line starting with a '#' is a comment and is ignored
2# Blank lines are also ignored
3
4# You can run these files with something like:
5# python trace_ordering.py example_config.txt
6# This will locate the neccessary strace output files and feed them into the model
7
8
9# The command 'ignore' can be used to tell the model that a given IP or IP and port should be ignored
10
11# For example:
12ignore 127.0.0.1
13# This tells the model to ignore any traffic to or from the IP 127.0.0.1
14
15# You can specify an IP and port by separating them with a comma:
16ignore 127.0.0.1,53
17# Be sure not to put any white space between the command port number!
18# This particular IP and port shows up a lot for DNS lookups and needs
19# to be ignored, but ip_matching.py ignores it by default so explicitly
20# ignoring 127.0.0.1:53 is redundant.
21
22
23# The 'host' command starts an entry for a new host. Any commands except 'ignore'
24# and 'host' with be part of the entry for the most recently declared host
25# You can specify a name for the host if you want:
26host foo
27# but you don't have to:
28host
29
30
31# The 'trace' command specifies an strace file collected on this host:
32 trace file_name
33# The file_name can either be an absolute path or the path relative to
34# directory the config file is located in, so if just the file name is
35# given then the trace should be in the same folder as the config file
36
37# Like with hosts, you can give traces names if you want to:
38 trace file_name bar
39# This doesn't do much currently, but may be used to produce more
40# readable output later
41
42# Notice that the example 'trace' command is indented a space
43# This extra whitespace is ignored, but makes config files more readable
44
45# You can specify as many trace files as you want for a single host,
46# and doing so tells the model that these traces can communicate with
47# each other over the loopback interface
48
49
50# The 'ip' command tells the model that a host has an interface with that IP:
51 ip 128.208.4.96
52
53# The model assumes that all hosts already have access to loopback, unspecified,
54# and multicast addresses, so there is no need to list them explicitly
55
56
57# The 'nat' command associates an IP or IP and port mapping with a host
58# The first address is the private IP that the host binds to and the
59# second one is the public IP that other hosts can connect to:
60 nat 192.168.0.8 128.238.38.67
61 nat 192.168.1.50,3005 96.250.21.150,3001
62
63# Like with 'ignore', if you specify ports then the IP and port must be
64# seperated by a comma and there must not be any whitespace after the comma
65
66
67# Here is an example of an actual configuration file. There is a server
68# node whose IP is 128.238.66.220, and a client node whose IP is
69# 192.168.0.8 and which is behind a NAT with a public IP of 128.238.38.67.
70
71# Configuration for WEBrick MTU test
72
73host
74 trace wb-mtu-server.trace server
75 ip 128.238.66.220
76
77host
78 trace wb-mtu-client.trace client
79 ip 192.168.0.8
80 nat 192.168.0.8 128.238.38.67
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